Indestructible


When Mark Martindale decided to trace the evolutionary origin of muscle cells, like the ones that form our hearts, he looked in an unlikely place: the genes of animals without hearts or muscles. In a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the University of Florida scientist and colleagues found genes known to form hearts cells in humans and other animals in the gut of a muscle-less and heartless sea anemone. But the sea anemone isn't just any sea creature. It has superpower-like abilities: Cut it into many pieces and each piece will regenerate into a new animal.

So why does the sea anemone regenerate while humans cannot? When analyzing the function of its "heart genes," study researchers discovered a difference in the way these genes interact with one another, which may help explain its ability to regenerate, said Martindale, a UF biology professor and director of the Whitney Lab for Marine Bioscience in St. Augustine. The study's findings point to potential for tweaking communication between human genes and advancing our ability to treat heart conditions and stimulate regenerative healing, he said. "Our study shows that if we learn more about the logic of how genes that give rise to heart cells talk to each other, muscle regeneration in humans might be possible," Martindale said.

Continued research could one day allow scientists to coax muscles cells into regenerating different kinds of new cells, including more heart cells!

Kemo D. 7
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