June 13th, 2017

2030 AD


From highly trained scientists toiling away at research institutes to amateur enthusiasts gazing upward from their backyards, humanity boasts no shortage of people looking for life beyond Earth. Add to that the massive size of the Universe - estimates range in the trillions of galaxies - and probability dictates that we should have already encountered another species by now. And yet, we still have no evidence that we aren't alone in the Universe. However, according to astronomy researcher Chris Impey, this hunt for life beyond Earth may soon yield results. In an interview with Futurism, he revealed that he believes that we are less than two decades away from finding extraterrestrial life... but it may not be the kind of life we were hoping for: "I put my money on detecting microbial life in 10 to 15 years, but not at all detecting intelligent life."

While Impey is sceptical that intelligent life is within our sights, he does have a couple of suggestions as to where we should focus our search for extraterrestrial lifeforms, intelligent or not. The first is our own backyard, or, more accurately, our own Solar System. While Impey tells Futurism he doesn't rule out the possibility that life still exists on Mars, he says that those lifeforms are likely below the surface and are, therefore, much harder to detect. As such, he asserts that we have a better chance of finding evidence of life that used to exist on the Red Planet: "If we actually get Mars rocks back here to Earth from a place that we think could have been habitable in the past, then we might find evidence of prior life."

Other bodies in our Solar System could potentially host life as well, according to Impey, including the water world Europa.

Kemo D. 7

Building a Better World

Welcome the newest class of billionaires who have pledged to give the majority of their wealth to philanthropic causes. Fourteen more billionaires have signed on to the Giving Pledge – the initiative created by Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett in 2010 to “help address society’s most pressing problems”  by shifting “the social norms of philanthropy toward giving more, giving sooner and giving smarter.”

The new signatories plan to use their wealth to support causes focused on poverty alleviation, education, healthcare research, climate change and the environment.

“We all have a moral obligation as the more affluent in society to give back as best we know how,” MeTL Group CEO Mohammed Dewji of Tanzania said in a statement.

“Bill and Warren and I are excited to welcome the new, very international group of philanthropists joining the Giving Pledge, and we look forward to learning from their diverse experiences,”  Melinda Gates said in a press release.

More than 168 billionaires have now signed the pledge and they represent 21 countries and range in age from 31 to 93.

Kemo D. 7
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